guitarist

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by electric guitar, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. electric guitar

    electric guitar New Member

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    who do you think the greatest guitarist is?
  2. Daniel

    Daniel New Member

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    Depends... Which style are talking about? From my point of view, there are multiple categories that guitarists fall into, and there are certain players who are masters of their craft. Take Yngwie Malmsteen, and compare him to Steve Morse. You can't really compare them, can you? Two completely different players, and two completely different styles and musical tastes...
  3. Andew

    Andew New Member

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    I'm the greatest of all;):). Just joking. To me Jimi Hendrix. No doubt that in year 2012 Jimi is still number 1 in the world!!!
  4. mrspiffy

    mrspiffy A member of the Spiffy Club.

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    Nigel Tufnel... Or the dude from Venom.
  5. KjDouglas88

    KjDouglas88 New Member

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    My Opinion and i am more of a Metal head in my Tastes But it would Have To be Chuck Schuldiner From the Band Death. I put him as greatest not only because of his playing ability but His Writing and composing on his Songs. Truly the innovator Of Technical or progressive metal.
  6. mick

    mick New Member

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    Evening from a newbie. For me it's got to be Gary Moore. ;) Such a shame he's no longer with us.
  7. Roppongen

    Roppongen New Member

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    There is no greatest guitarist, but some of my favorites are Terry Kath, who has never been replaced in this world and was said by Hendrix to be better than he was.

    Also Justin Hayward, who is seldom noticed because of the orchestral framework the Moody Blues play out of - just listen to some of the beautiful supporting melodic lines he adds to so many of their songs.

    Jimi Hendrix, who is just simply, Hendrix. Unfortunately he died just as some of his reformative works were going to tape and too many have never become familiar with pieces like Pali Gap and the beautifully haunting solos on Hey Baby (Land of the New Rising Sun), or given too short shrift to the incredible Villa Nova Junction at the end of the Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock.

    Steve Vai once said of Hendrix, that all the people who felt he wasn't all that incredible were neglecting to think of his music in comparison to what else was out at the time, and more importantly, where did he come up with all of it?

    Hendrix gets overlooked in his influenced by the PC opinion that he was a blues player, and of course he said as much himself, but his father once said in an interview that he was always holding the guitar the whole time he was watching TV, and we all know what music you hear coming from that box - everything in the universe including tons of classical and big band music.
    Hendrix's music came from everywhere, for everyone.

    Of course some of my choices have been completely off the radar for most, and a couple all too obvious and my last one is almost a foregone conclusion when I say Steve Vai.

    Nothing more to add that he hasn't already played himself, but it just shakes me to the core when I watch the incredibly powerful video of him doing Gravity Storm, and how far over the edge he pushes himself to keep the genuine intensity in the music.

    The last name I going to mention, none of you have ever, and will never hear of, but Gerald VanValkinburgh was playing in bars when he was 16 and seemed destined for an easy entry into the bigger game of international celebrity when he got derailed and has been in obscurity ever since.

    When he wrote songs, whether folksy acoustic, blues, odd-meter rock, orchestral pieces, strange reggae (of which I only ever heard one), straight on hard rockers, darkly inspired ballads, or Paul Simonesque radio friendly numbers, they all sounded like his specialty.
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013

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